We resolving information conflict. Hence, we respond slower than

We printed two papers for this experience. The first paper
was printed in the list of 100 color names that were different from the colors
of the name. No word was printed in the color it named, each name was printed
in five different colors. The form of the test will be printed in English. For
example, the word “red” was printed in “blue”. Next, the rest paper was printed
in the list of 100 solid squares size 24 printed in different colors. We asked
directly 20 participants, not using the survey. Firstly, the participants read
a list of 100 words for colors, but the words are printed in a color different to
the word itself. For example, the word “red” would be listed as text, but
printed in green. So, when the word “red” is printed in green, the participants
should say “red” and move on to the next word. The participant’s reading time
of the words on the list is then recorded. Then, the participants read a list
of 100 solid squares in different colors. When the squares are printed in red,
the participants say red and move on to the next squares. We recorded the time.

After collected the data, we see that the time needed for the participants to
read the words in the first paper (The paper was printed in the list of 100
color names that were different from the colors of the name) is longer than the
time they need to read the word in the second paper (the paper was printed in
the list of 100 solid squares size 24 printed in different colors), under the
effect of incongruent stimuli. The average time of the list word colors is
128.75 seconds, and the average of the solid squares is 84.15 seconds. The results
demonstrate that the brain is subject to reading. Our cognitive load will be increased once there is a conflict
between these two sources of information. This causes the brain to work harder
in order to resolve the problem. The brain then must perform the following
tasks: avoid reading, defining word color, and resolving information conflict. Hence,
we respond slower than normal. We are more likely to force ourselves to ignore
the meaning of the words and focus on the colors when doing this test. Researchers
have found that we were likely using our posterior dorsolateral prefrontal
cortex to do so. This part of the brain has been seen to be active through
brain scans during Stroop tests, and is loosely understood as helping us create
heuristics or “rules” for processing what’s in front of us. As we try to read
the color and avoid the words, we are deliberately “shutting off” the parts of our
brain that are used to recognize the meaning of the texts. The Stroop task also
involves the anterior cingulate cortex, which deals with memory, executive
function, problem solving and making decisions on how to allocate mental
resources”

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