This following page is a personal account of three

This following page is a personal account of three non-Christian places of prayer or worship in Ireland that I have visited. The first place I visited my first non-Christian places a Sikh Temple. The temple we visited was Gurdwara Guru Nanak Darbar in Sandymouth Dublin 4. Next, I visited the Chester Beatty library which was established in Dublin in 1950, they house the collections of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, which is on the grounds of Dublin Castle. My last visit was to the Kagyu Samye Dzong is a Dublin based Tibetan Buddhist meditation center founded in 1977. I found from visiting the three non-Christian places of prayer or worship. They have integrated into Irish society, by being involved in local communities and welcoming to other faiths and informing them about their places of prayer or worship.    Thus interfaith begins when a bridge is created between one set of beliefs and traditions and another. We start by listening to one another, and to the humanity in all of us. Interfaith emphasizes the universal principles and spiritual compassion taught by all schools of divinity and ethics. These three non-Christian places of prayer or worship in my view a model of interfaith.  Interfaith begins when a bridge is created between one set of beliefs and traditions and another. We start by listening to one another, and to the humanity in all of us. Interfaith emphasizes the universal principles and spiritual compassion taught by all schools of divinity and ethics.Gurdwara Guru Nanak DarbarBefore visiting Gurudwara Guru Nanak Darbar we had a guest lecture of Dr. Puri. We were informed at the lecture that to dress appropriately, strictly no smoking is allowed and all must cover our heads. On the 13th of October 2017, as part of World Religions Module, I visited my first non-Christian places a Sikh Temple. The temple we visited was Gurdwara Guru Nanak Darbar in Sandymouth Dublin 4. Sikhism was founded in the Punjab by Guru Nanak in the 15th century and is a monotheistic religion.                             The Gurdwara Gura Nanak Darbar is the Gurdwara of Dublin Ireland. It has two main halls Divian Hall and the Langar Hall. Divian Hall is the main hall where the holy Gury Granth Shib is kept. First impressions of The Gurudwara Guru Nanak Dar is everyone irrespective of any region or religion is welcome. On first entering, all visitors will have to remove their shoes and socks. Next, we were given a handkerchief which represents a turban normally worn by Sikh men and chunni a long, flowing semi-transparent lain cloth worn by women. On first entering the prayer room a small bow to the Guru Granth Sahib Show respect to the host community. Chairs are not provided in the Gurudwara instead we were seated on a carpet sitting in a cross-legged yoga style in a circle.                         Directly across from me was the speaker who represented the temple. He explained they have regular tours of there temple as part of the interfaith dialogue with the local community. He began to explain the foundations of Sikhism. It was founded in India around 1500 AD by Guru Nanak, who lived from 1469 to 1539 AD he was the first of the ten gurus or teachers of the Sikhs. They also believe there is only one God, God is without form or gender. That everyone has direct access to God and everyone is equal before God. Interfaith is clearly evident in their belief. That a good life is lived as part of a community by living honestly and caring for others.                                From the introduction of Sikhism, I found marriage as the most captivating was Marriage in Sikhism tradition. Anand Karaj is the name of the Sikh marriage ceremony. It means a joyful union that was introduced by Guru Amar Das. It is a joyous and festive event in which families and friends from both sides are heavily involved. I found it interesting that the bride walks behind the groom and that it was compared to a horse and carriage; the wife is the rains and the husband is the horse. This demonstrates the marriage is a partnership of equals. He also explains Sikh beliefs on Interfaith marriage. It is better to get married to someone with whom share the similar belief. Sikhism does not state that marrying out of religion is wrong or a sin. The more a married couple has in common the more likely their marriage to be successful.                                           After are a brief introduction of Skihism we are shown example a prayer service. During the service, a person with a whisk or a fan called a Chaur waves it over the Guru Granth Sahib a sign of respect. After the service, we entered the Langar Hall. The food was simple, to prevent wealthy congregations turning it into a feast. It evident that Sikhism is an interfaith community providing food without charge and visible there happy to see that our class was so interested in the religion.  Chester Beatty LibraryThe Chester Beatty Library was established in Dublin in 1950, they house the collections of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, which is on the grounds of Dublin Castle. The library’s collections are displayed in two collections, ‘Sacred Traditions’ and ‘Artistic Traditions’. Both display exhibit manuscripts, painting, prints and rare books. The exhibition I will focus on is the sacred traditions exhibition. It features primary sources from Islam, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Sikhism, and Jainism, in the following paragraphs, I will describe two objects from sacred traditions exhibition.                                The primary sources I have chosen come from the Islamic collection. They are sourced from the Arab world, Iran, Turkey, and India. These countries are traditional Islam moiety faith countries. Islam is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God and the Muhammed is a messenger of God. The Islamic Collections are internationally renowned in the Chester Beatty library.                                 Many Muslims say they know little about other faiths. Only know knowledge of consent interfaith classes in Sub – Sharan Africa. From what I learned About Islam, I believe students with different faiths could learn about other faiths in the library. Interfaith begins when a bridge is created between one set of beliefs and traditions and another. We start by listening to one another, and to the humanity in all of us.            The first primary source I found interesting is The Quran is the Holy Book of the Islamic faith. From visiting the library Muslims consider it a record of the exact words of God as transmitted to the Prophet Muhammed by the Archangel Gabriel. The Qur’an was relieved to Muhammad over a period of more than twenty years, both in Mecca and in Medina. It is divided into 114 chapters each comprising several verses. Chapters are arranged more or less in order of decreasing length, not in the order in which they were revealed. The content and content and tone of the Mecca and Medina chapters tend to differ. Chapters revealed in Mecca deal more strictly with theological matters. Those revealed in community law reflecting Muhammad’s new role as head of a whole community.                Islamic art seeks to portray the meaning and essence of the things rather than just their physical form. Calligraphy is major art – form, writing has high status in Islam. Books are a major art form. In the Quran, it exhibits a typical Islamic illumination. It consists of flat, two- dimensional work. For example, the eye is made up of three layers, uppermost are the two central, facing rectangular areas bordered by a frame of flowers on a black ground, blocked from view. The only part that is visible is the ansas. The ansas are three triangle forms, which emerge from a front piece. Finally with a distant layer hidden by another edge visible which is blue boarded. Islam art is often vibrant. It’s strong aesthetic appeal.                     The second primary source I found interesting five Pillars of Islam which were represented by texts in the Library. I found from reading information and study the objects that the five pillars of Islam are the five obligations that every Muslim must satisfy in order to live a good and responsible life according to Islam. The Five Pillars consist of: Shahada: sincerely reciting the Muslim profession of faith. Salat: Performing ritual prayers in the proper way five times each day. Zakat: paying an alms, tax to benefit the poor and the needy. Sawn: fasting during the month of Ramadan. Hajj: the pilgrimage to Mecca. Carrying out these obligations provides the framework of the Muslim’s life, and weaves their everyday activities and their beliefs into the single cloth of religious devotion. No matter how sincerely a person may believe Islam regards it as pointless to live life without putting that faith into action and practice. Carrying out the five pillars demonstrates that the Muslims is putting their faith first and not just trying to fit it in around their secular lives.Kagyu Samye Dzong Tibetan Buddhist Meditation CentreThe last non-Christian places of prayer or worship I visited was The Kagyu Samye Dzong is a Dublin based Tibetan Buddhist meditation center founded in 1977, the oldest established Buddhist Centre in Ireland. Their spiritual director is his holiness the 17th Gyalwa Karma Kagyu Lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. Our Spiritual Director is his Holiness the 17th Gyalwa Karmapa Orgyen Trinely Dogre. There founder and director Choje Akong Tulku Rinpoche first brought Tibetan Buddhism to the West in 1963. The Kagyu tradition has its origin in the Buddhism of India a thousand years ago and is one of the four principal Buddhist schools of Tibet. Lama Yeshe Losal Rimpoche is Kagya Samye Dzong Dublin’s Abbot and Director. Born in Kham, Tibet in 1943. In 1980 he took full ordination from his holiness the 16th Karmapa.                                            Buddhism one of the major world religions is a spiritual tradition that was founded over 2500 years ago during the time of Shakyamuni Buddha. The history of Buddhism is the story of ones man’s spiritual journey of Enlightenment and of the teachings and ways of living that developed from it. The Buddha was born as an ordinary man named Siddhartha Gautama in 563 BC. His father was the ruler of the Sakya people a tribe that governed an area in the modern day Nepal Siddhartha led a life of luxury and privilege but at age of 29, realized the world was full of suffering. It is renounced his noble birth and became an ascetic wanderer. After six years, he reached enlightenment. He spent the rest of his life spreading his new philosophy.                                        Buddhist temples come in many shapes. Perhaps the best known is the pagodas of China and Japan. Buddhist temples are designed to symbolize the fire, air, earth, water, and wisdom. All Buddhist temples contain an image or a statue of Buddha. Shoes are removed Shrine Room avoid pointing feet to the Buddha as it is a sign of disrespect. The most important part of a Buddhist temple is the shrine room which contains one or more Buddharupus. Any place where an image of the Buddha is used in worship is known as a shrine and many Buddhists also have shrines at home.                          In Kagyu Samye Dzong Dublin we present a wide and varied programme of activities, Meditation teachings on Buddhism, the regular weekly programme of silent and chanting practices and mindfulness programmes. The regular programme Shinay Meditation 6:30 – 7:30 pm and first Tuesday of the month introduction to Buddhism. Meditation is a mental and physical course of action that a person uses to separate themselves from their thoughts and feelings in order to become fully aware. In Buddhism the person meditating is not trying to get into a hypnotic state or contract angles or any other supernatural entity. Meditation involves the body and the mind. For Buddhists, this is particularly important as they want to avoid what they call ‘duality’ and so their way of meditating must involve the body and the mind as a single entity.

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